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California Fishing Bans

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California has now banned fishing in some of the state's drought-stricken streams in an effort to protect salmon and steelhead.



Source: San Jose Mercury

 

The closures are aimed at protecting as many fish as possible as stream flows dwindle because of the severe drought, said Charlton Bonham, director of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife.


"We fully understand the impact these closures will have on California anglers and the businesses related to fishing in California, and we really feel for them," Bonham said in a statement. "However the science is clear. Two-thirds of the wettest part of winter is now behind us, and conditions are looking increasingly grim."


Among the closures are the San Lorenzo River and its tributaries in Santa Cruz County; the Big Sur River and area streams; the Eel River in Humboldt County; and others.


Some anglers took the news in stride, saying the long-term health of the environment will benefit fishermen in the future.


"There will certainly be an impact this year on anglers and the businesses that supply them. But anglers would be ill-served in the long run by further stressing the present populations in coastal streams," Marc Gorelnik, of the Coastside Fishing Club, said. "First and foremost, we must be responsible stewards of our state's natural resources."


Most of California is in extreme drought, which led Gov. Jerry Brown to declare a drought emergency.


The state this week also released a list of 17 rural communities in danger of running out of water within four months.


The sheer number of closures suggests how dire the dry weather has become for struggling populations of steelhead and salmon, both of which live part of their lives in fresh coastal streams and the ocean.


"To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time the department has taken this kind of emergency action," said Jordan Traverso, a department spokeswoman.


The agency also recommended that the state Fish and Game Commission close parts of the much larger American and Russian rivers at the commission's Feb. 5 meeting.


"Let's just all hope for rain," Traverso said.







Articles by the same author






Comments (12 posted):

trout trekker on 30/01/2014 20:05:06
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Re:"To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time the department has taken this kind of emergency action," said Jordan Traverso, a department spokeswoman. Is there no one left in our fisheries branch with more than a few years of tenure? Ill be the first to agree that fishermen for all of their log keeping are some of the most forgetful sportsmen in the world when it comes to keeping track of the larger issues ( like annual precipitation ) that define their seasonal sporting opportunities. But surely veteran coastal watershed steelheaders know of past ( emergency ) closures put into place due to low water. I had one of those "bang your head on the table" moments a couple of nights ago. I live along the Feather River, near the confluence of the Yuba river. We see the impact on a daily basis. This past Sunday night we found ourselves in Reno, Nevada at one of the first performances of Dolly Partons 2014 World Tour. ( 68 years young and shes still a hoot. ) We were seated next to a very nice group of mature adults from San Jose, CA at the concert and during the intermission we struck up a conversation with them. At one point they asked where we lived, worked, played etc. ( the Feather R. at the confluence of the Yuba R., which flow down to met the Lower Sacramento River. ) at which point one of the gals leans forward and asks, Are you starting to have a drought up there too? When my seizure subsided, I politely responded yes. Yes, San Jose residents..Might they be getting their news from the San Jose Mercury News, the purveyors of this fine article. From the San Jose Mercury News 1/26/14 The board of the Santa Clara Valley Water District, a government agency based in San Jose that provides drinking water to 1.8 million people, is expected to approve a "preliminary water use reduction target" of 10 percent lower than the county used last year. Thats big of them.:punk: At this point, Im really starting to wonder if the message is getting through to urban / metro water users. TT
Hardyreels on 30/01/2014 20:36:25
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That's what I was talking about on yesterdays thread. What you need is a pipe line that runs from Alaska to California with a whole bunch of small pipes contributing to the volume as it goes. :) We generally have way more water than is needed by man or fish.......
plecain on 30/01/2014 20:40:38
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At this point, I’m really starting to wonder if the message is getting through to urban / metro water users. If you asked your 'mature adults' where water comes from you might get the "From the faucet. Where else?" answer.
Bigfly on 30/01/2014 20:45:34
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Ard, don't give them any ideas.... You might end up without enough. Folks down in So-cal are insatiable.....The land of swimming pools will never get it. The farmers are raising crops we don't eat, with water we need. The good news, is we got a little snow today!!! Think good thoughts. Jim
runningfish on 31/01/2014 18:24:31
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Ard, don't give them any ideas.... You might end up without enough. Folks down in So-cal are insatiable.....The land of swimming pools will never get it. The farmers are raising crops we don't eat, with water we need. The good news, is we got a little snow today!!! Think good thoughts. Jim Sad but true Jim. As expected, I washed my van 24 hours ago on a bright sunny So Cal afternoon and voila! we had some rain last night and the dark cloud still lingers. Hopefully we will get more this weekend.
fredaevans on 02/02/2014 16:50:56
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That's what I was talking about on yesterdays thread. What you need is a pipe line that runs from Alaska to California with a whole bunch of small pipes contributing to the volume as it goes. :) We generally have way more water than is needed by man or fish....... Not from Alaska but from the south shore of the Columbia River down the east side of the State of Oregon. Break in the pipe and all you got was a huge mud puddle. End of the pipe (as I recall) was to be Lake Shasta; from there you already had the 'Central Cannal' running down the Sacramento Valley. Don't remember why the idea hit the wall but I think the State of Oregon said 'No Way Jose.' One way or the other the 'build' would have been a very straight forward project.
oarfish on 03/02/2014 20:52:24
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That's what I was talking about on yesterdays thread. What you need is a pipe line that runs from Alaska to California with a whole bunch of small pipes contributing to the volume as it goes. :) We generally have way more water than is needed by man or fish....... Yea Ard theres a movement called Straws that would draw fresh water from all the major rivers north of SF to AK with pipes laid on the coast floor from AK to CA, my problem is what will that do to the environmental life do to the loss of fresh water to the echo system. You dont need to answer this question, its just one of mine. Rick
Hardyreels on 03/02/2014 21:05:07
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Oh I thought about that Rick, but if each tributary to the main line was small and had the intake inside a small weir so that our fish wouldn't get into the mix, we have lots of water as does most of the Yukon and BC. At this time it sounds ridiculous but I bet in 50 years it will be a reality. There are just too many people in the drought zones. I think that when in severe drought water should be rationed, regardless of economic class. There has to be a limit placed on any resource that is being disseminated by waste. A few years ago out septic drain field was frozen. I learned a whole lot about water conservation that winter. At the cabin there is no well, conservation is key there also. In the American general population I would guess that we have at least 300 million people who have never considered those 2 words in the same thought or sentence, water & conservation.
oarfish on 03/02/2014 21:45:22
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In the American general population I would guess that we have at least 300 million people who have never considered those 2 words in the same thought or sentence, water & conservation. I will agree with the two words, folks here want to draw more water from our protected rivers and streams, they are asked to conserve 20% and they can see no way, I've just reduced our laundry water and energy use by 80% using Bosch equipment, has a whole as humans we must give back. Enough of my rant.
pm287 on 03/02/2014 23:03:19
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In the American general population I would guess that we have at least 300 million people who have never considered those 2 words in the same thought or sentence, water & conservation I will buy a round on Ards' comment!!!!!!! Paul
changler on 03/02/2014 23:07:56
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Pretty scary situation, not just for the anadromous fishes but for the unique salmonid diversity in interior streams. Hope it starts raining- and quick.
trout trekker on 05/02/2014 23:39:03
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The headline sums it up. [CENTER]Emergency fishing closure approved on American, Russian rivers.[/CENTER] See: Emergency fishing closure approved on American, Russian rivers - Our Region - The Sacramento Bee Personally Id like to see the closures extended to a least one more river and I believe there are others beyond those included, that could be easily identified as having been overly vulnerable, for a while now. What does it say about us? Unwilling to voluntarily cease an activity, even in the face of obvious visual cues. TT
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