Thread: rod ferrule wax
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Old 06-23-2010, 09:14 AM
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Default Re: rod ferrule wax

St. Croix always provides a nice little wax disc with their USA made rods. I've used it on rod sections that seem to get stuck often, but not on others. A
rod builder/master fly angler told me that it's largely intended to fill the gaps as rods get older, and ferrules begin to click. I've never had a rod that held together better because of wax, and back when I thought that would work, the sections came apart more easily.

Out of 7 or more rods, I have maybe 2 male ferrules that get wax once every couple months. I called a Sage repair tech a couple weeks ago, asking about
ferrule fit and how much pressure can be applied when fitting sections. He told me not to worry about pushing too hard, and that it would I couldn't push
the sections together with enough force to cause damage. Hmmmm..... He could be right if the sections were pushed together dead straight, and I'd want my hands to be very close to the ends of each section.

I've been using the 90 degree twist to lock technique to fit sections together for several years. A fly shop posted a YouTube video about fitting sections last weeks, and the owner was very emphatic about pushing them together straight, and not twisting. I gave it a try, and it did hold better! I always thought that twisting a rolled blank might not be a good idea, and not just because it's rolled. I've been using the straight together technique with great success since then. Of course bamboo rods get pushed together straight as well.

Wax? Yeah, if you have a section that's not performing the way you'd like it to, and a lubricant of some sort would help. Beeswax is sticky, so parrafin wax
is the type you want.
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