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Old 05-16-2007, 10:07 AM
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Default Re: Inexpensive Reels Compared

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joefishin View Post
The post I made on 8 to 10 wt rods is drawing such a crowd that I figured I ask about less expensive fly reels. The purpose of these reels in question is to catch salmon in Alaska.

I can get a decent discount on Scientific Anglers System 2, Martin, Okuma Helios, Pflueger Trion and Summit reels. Are any of these capable of catching salmon and surviving a multiday trip? The reels I am interested in will be for rods in the 8 to 10wt class.

Since I am not an expert on this stuff, I can only guess that not all of the reels mentioned will have the capacity of 100' weight forward sinking tip fly line, plus the recommended 150yds of backing. I would assume that the backing should be 30# test as well.. Anybody have any idea, knowledge on these points?

If need be I will break down and pay for a more expensive reel, but I was hoping that at least one of these "working man" brands would be good enough.
I lived in Alaska for 15 years and caught all of my salmon and trout on a eight weight rod with a SA System reel. I don't remember ever getting into my backing. You will be fine with a 100/150 yards of backing. Fishing for salmon requires heavier leaders and with the right rod you can control the fish. The one exception is King Salmon due to their size. A eight weight rod is light if you are going just for Kings. The SA reel served me well but it would not be my choice today. I bought it due to cost and in the 70's there was not as good a choice as there is today. If you are taking only one line, then a sink tip is a good choice. If you can afford it, I would get a $250 to $300 reel. This range offers some really nice reels that you will appreciate for the rest of your fishing days. If you pick the right size and buy more spools as needed, you won't have to buy another reel.
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