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Old 07-18-2010, 08:55 AM
wjc wjc is offline
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Default Re: Question Re: Transition from Back to Forward cast

Good advice from fly2fish. I would also click the link "The Five Essentials" on this page, read them and watch the animations.

For some reason, it has become anathema to watch the backcast for the majority of fly fishermen - though even a casual look at world-class distance casting competitions will reveal that - without a single exception - every one watches his backcast once he has the carry he wants, before the final forward cast.

Steve Rajeff, probably the best distance fly caster in the world, won his first American all-round championship at age 16 in 1972 and was still looking at his backcasts when he won the last big fly-distance only championship in Denver in 2009. He had also won the American Casting Association's All Around National Championship for 34 consecutive years.

Incidentally, a few years back, at a promotional show, Steve bet Freddy Couples he could cast a golf ball further than Freddie could drive one - one try each. Fredie drove a ball a measured 333 yards. Steve then cast a golf ball with his surf rod - a measured 337 yards.

My point is, that if the world's best fly casters watch their backcasts without exception when competing for money, prizes and fame, it must help them more than "feel". When fishing, or casting in accuracy events, none of them watch their backcasts of course.

But I would strongly reccommend that newcomers to fly casting do as fly2fish has recommended.

Cheers,
Jim
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