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Old 07-19-2010, 08:25 PM
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Default Re: What Size Flies For 1 to 1-1/2 lb Brook Trout?

I can relate to that, however I would caution against harvesting the largest males from the fishery. Those fish are indeed your hope for the future of fishing there. I also would keep a tight lip regarding any positive results to any other fishermen as far as where you fish exactly.

The first thing to do is to not fish, spend some time observing the pond. You haven't mentioned whether this is a beaver pond or some man made one. If there is an inflow you will want to pay close attention to that area. Through observation you will learn where the larger fish reside and feed. The smaller fish will occupy those ares allowed them by the absence of large fish.

Once determining where the fish are at you must now consider presentation. If the pond gets sufficient fishing pressure the large fish that remain are not there because they are stupid. They will be wary. Although windy days are not the best for casting fly lines they along with rainy days create enough surface disturbance to help to hide the landing of a fly line. If you wish to fish surface flies I would not go larger than a #18 Blue Quill and otherwise would use Lew Oatman's Brook Trout Minnow tied to his recipe.

The rest is up to you as far as your ability to make presentations when and where you need to. The point of study and observation can not be stressed enough. All to often a person begins fishing while having no prior knowledge as to where the fish are at. This often results in poor yield in catch. I do not cast until I am pretty sure I'm going to catch something. This would perhaps be a good experiment for you to adapt as regular practice.

Good luck,

Ard
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