Thread: Flatwing Flies
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Old 07-30-2010, 04:51 AM
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Default Re: Flatwing Flies

Its been a while since I've been to the Crazy Horse, J-P. If I catch a few Stripers, I may have to go back - just to see if you're right!

---------- Post added at 05:51 AM ---------- Previous post was at 05:42 AM ----------

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisinselwynNZ View Post
Nice, the sparse dressing should give good movement while you strip them in

Chris
Chris,

Yes, the sparseness, according to Abrames, is supposed to be one of the keys to getting good side-to-side motion. Apparently he developed this method to be able to get movement out of his flies even when they were dead drifted.

If you look at each of the flatwings, you'll see that the "tails" are supported by bucktail. The material for the support is taken from the bottom of the tail; where the hairs are he stiffest; hence offering the best support. When three or more feathers are used to make the flatwing tail, he also uses a cock hackle as an additional support.

The flatwing feathers that I used were Whiting American hen hackle; tied in so that the curvature of the feather is facing down. When I tied in 3+ hen feathers, the support feather was a Whiting American cock hackle; tied in with the curvature facing up.

I think that this saltwater concept has application for trout, too. I've got some ideas that I'm going to try to develop when I'm back in September.

Pocono
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