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Old 09-09-2010, 07:07 PM
peregrines peregrines is offline
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Default Re: newbe to the salt

Quote:
Originally Posted by hunter1 View Post
Hi, Peregrines. i'll be fishing on asssateague island Virginia 1st week in oct 2010. also chincoteauge island, Assateague i have atlantic ocean on one side and salt marshes and bay on other side.Local shop said blues, stripers, kingfish, and reds should be running then.Would this help you with my fly selection, When should i use the sinking line and the floating. I'll be fishing from the beach , no boat.
Those flies are a good choice-- maybe adding a few others-- something like a size 1/0 crease fly or popper for top water-- it might help to draw fish (especially blues) to you, and they're fun to fish. Another thing you might want to add is something about 2- 2 1/2" long with a white belly and tan back to imitate bay anchovies (often referred to as "rain bait" or "white bait") that should be pouring out of the back bays. They often form dense schools that get crashed by stripers and blue fish, but also bring in false albacore, spanish macks and bonito. A couple size 2 or 4 flies in those colors (tan over white) Examples of patterns that would be good imitations are Surf Candies or stuff like "Bonito Bunny's", "Skok's Mushmouth", or (God forbid) "Gummy Minnows".

Clousers are a good imitation for sandeels, and you'd want to fish them close to the bottom, ideally puffing up some sand or mud as it falls. They'll catch summer flounder (fluke) too in addition to stuff like channel bass, rockfish (stripers) and blues. And Deceivers are also a good choice for a wide range of fish, with a generic baitfish shape that imitates a wide range of bait.

As far as sinker or floater, if you're wading for the most part the slope off should be gradual enough to use the floater most of the time. Save the sinker for fishing drop offs, and if there are some areas like cuts or channels that you can reach deeper water (by bridges as an example), cast up tide to allow the fly to sink as deep as you can get it, and let it swing it in the current.

Rip Tide's advice about a shooting basket is also key--- you'll get much more distance on your cast if you're not trying to rip slack floating line off the water surface--- and trying to rip slack SINKING fly line out of the water is almost impossible.

Again I would plan on targeting the back bays and inlets especially if you have "high surf" conditions out front- but if you have relatively calm conditions it might be fishable with a fly rod. Although it can bust loose anytime, often the best fishing is during periods of low light as fish come into the shallows to feed, and during periods of moving water as opposed to slack current. Timing for current (horizontal movement of water) and tides (vertical movement of water) may often vary by several hours, especially around inlets, meaning that you may still have incoming water (current) long after high tide, so try and get a sense of the timing of daily currents/tides from a local bait and tackle shop once you're down there. And as you probably know the ocean is also strongly influenced by the moon phases, with the highest high tides and lowest low tides and strongest cutrrents on (and in the few days before/after) the New Moon (around Oct 6-7) and Full Moons (Oct 22).

With the strong currents like you're likely to have, there's likely to be rip currents that form on certain stages of tides--- they might be off points, off flats that feed into a channel, off tips of jetties or bridge abutments-- these are prime places to find feeding fish. You might want to do the google earth thing to look for likely spots they might occur, and to look for them while you're down there. Keep an eye out for birds dive bombing the surface too-- usually that's a sure sign that bait is being chased to the surface by feeding fish below them, and especially this time of year it can go from not a bird in sight one second to a bazillion diving birds screaming over acres of boiling water the next.

Here's a link to a post that might help with some info:
New to saltwater, need help?

And if you tie let us know -- we can give you some ideas for easy patterns.
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