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Old 10-23-2010, 11:56 AM
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Default Re: low water and high water flies.

To simplify the issue; generally the terms are applied to a wet fly or streamer pattern. The low water fly is usually either smaller (hook size) or tied very sparse on the hook if using a fairly large hook. High water ties are most often made fuller with the materials providing more bulk (think of this as a larger profile) to the lure. The thinking is that in a higher / faster flow of water you are trying to attract attention to the fly with added size. In low clear water too much attention drawn to the flies size can be counterproductive. The smaller fly will land more softly and present more of a drifting morsel appearance rather than looking like the Bismark entering the pool. There is no hard fast rule for this because a fish will grab things as it chooses. The idea that a smaller or sparse pattern works better in low water is a generalization.
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