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Old 11-09-2010, 11:36 AM
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kglissmeyer1 kglissmeyer1 is offline
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Default Re: How do I tie Faster?

How often do you tie? Tying for five years says little about how much time you spent there during those five years, therefore, time at the vise is the real key. I tie every night for about two hours, if for no other reason than to stay well-practiced. Other hints are making sure you have all of the tools close at hand and many of us tie with scissors in our hand the entire time we are tying any given pattern.

Time at the vise speeds it up a lot over time with practice. I also hand whip my flies which seems to save a little time on each creation. There are a lot of tips and shortcuts out there, but, in the end, it comes down to whether or not you are happy with what you created.

One thing that helped me early on was to attend fly-tying shows and expos and sit in front of skilled tyers and pay attention to how they accomplished certain steps to each fly. The range of differences was tremendous, but I gleaned what I thought would work best for me and put it into practice. Some of those observed and practiced skills became my own, and some went by the wayside as not being very helpful. Find out what fits and works for you. But, ultimately you've got to be happy with the end results no matter how long it takes. If you're trying to get up to the speed of a commercial, production tyer, you need to ask if that is really what you want. Much of what I enjoy from tying has to do with the experience of sitting at the vise and creating something that I'm confident will fool fish, as well as the entire experience of all the tying steps and just the whole package of being there and doing that. It's plain fun, no matter how long it takes me for a particular pattern.

I've also learned there are some patterns that I won't attempt after first trying them. I still can't tie a decent No-hackle dun mayfly - too many thumbs and errant thread wraps and they never turn out like in the pictures...

Have fun and ask yourself why you need to speed up, or even if, after five satisfying years of tying, you really need to speed up. Just don't think you need to measure yourself against any other tyer. This skill is as individual as the many tyers who participate in it.

Have fun and enjoy the ride.

Kelly.
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