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Old 11-30-2010, 11:25 PM
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Default Re: Learning the spey cast on a Switch rod....

I can agree/disagree with just about everything that's been said so far. I first learned the basic casts with my single hander, snaps, c-speys, pokes and the single. Then I picked up an 11' switch, I had no hard times transitioning at all, like Ard said "understand the mechanics". With the modern lines out there now its easier than its ever been, but there are alot of variables. Personal preference, casting stroke, fly size, depth of water, and flows are all part of the equation you have to solve. Skagit style casts will get you fishing in no time with some observation and practice on the grass and its a good starting point to get familiar with the way the rod loads and how your own body mechanics come into play. Your buddy might like a 550 grain head while you might like 500, theres alot of playing around and finding what suits you best, to me that was the fun part. A two handed rod, whether switch or spey is way more personalized than the average single hander, for me its the most fun way to fish wets and dries ( if I can ever temp a GL fish to the surface). Your best bet is to link up with a shop that can offer "test drive" gear, play around with all the lines out there till you find what suits you and don't get caught up in what everyone else is casting. Most importantly remember to have fun with it!!!
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