View Single Post
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 02-21-2008, 01:00 AM
doc's Avatar
doc doc is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
Posts: 98
doc will become famous soon enough
Default Re: Can You Read A Lake?

Quote:
Originally Posted by GRN View Post
Doc, nice read, and as someone who has spent 30 years primarily hunting still water trout I believe it's right on. I have one thing to add for those who may find themselves on small glacially formed lakes without charts or electronics to rely on. In the northeast and Adirondacks, it's common to see points jutting out of the shore line, and in many cases pointing strait across the lake to a similar feature on the opposite side. Between those points you will quite often have a 'reef' of shallower water that extends across the lake... maybe not so shallow that you can see bottom, but shallow enough that it creates a very good feeding environment. There were three of these on the Adirondack lake I grew up on, and they were very productive. I've used this to find fish all over the northeast, and have confirmed it's virtue in the past few years studying these areas with a Lowrance. YMMV

TL's~
GRN, glad you liked the article. Excellent remark about the points on each side of the fishery. I tried to paint this sort of picture with... "The shoreline of a lake however, can give away some secrets about what's under the surface. Try and study the contour of the shoreline. These land features often continue below the water. A steep bank at the shoreline usually means a quick drop-off and a very flat shoreline usually continues on that way well below the surface." Unfortunately, the lakes I frequent most often in my neck of the woods are pothole lakes left over from the last ice age. Most have little structure leaving me with memories and mind images left in my brain from past trips to other fisheries. So the a pictures I try to paint don't always get as much detail as they should.

Thanks for the kind words,
Doc
__________________
"What a tourist terms a plague of insects, the fly angler calls a great hatch".
Doc's Ol' Blog House
AlbertaStillwaters.Com
Reply With Quote