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Old 01-31-2011, 10:06 PM
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Default Re: Midge Presentation

Coy: Midges have four stages, larva, pupa, emerger and finally the adult. I mostly fish the pupa stage, fished in a two or three fly nymph rig (if a three fly rig is legal). I start out setting the indicator at 1 1/2 to 2 times the depth of the water and keep adjusting as you move from spot to spot, being super careful to get a true dead drift on each float, it really helps to not cast too far and pick up line off the water as it drifts closer to your position, as it passes you should have most if not all the line off the water. The reason that the pupa or emerger in today's designs have some sort of bead or flash is that they are trying to imitate the gas bubble of the natural as it ascends to the surface which is very reflective. If I see fish feeding near the surface I switch to either the emerger or adult (or both). I do have some larva patterns, for those you want to be dredging the bottom. If your fishing stillwater or a river with a mild current you can also switch out the indicator and use a greased line approach, in this case you are watching the line for any movement like you would with the indicator. You will also want some pretty small sizes in your arsenal. I usually won't go larger than an 18 and go down to a size 26 depending on the water. For example, on the South Platte you will probably be fishing a size 24 or 26, the same goes for the San Juan. A really good book on Midges is "Modern Midges" by Rick Takahashi and Jerry Hubka. Pat Dorsey's book "Fly Fishing Tailwaters" is also another very good book. Pat's other book which is also excellent it is "Tying and Fishing Tailwater Flies".

Larry
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Larry


Last edited by mcnerney; 01-31-2011 at 10:46 PM.
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