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Old 02-18-2011, 12:31 AM
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Default Re: A switch outfit for trout?

Here is where I draw the line between 6 weight and 7 weight. It is the delivery system. If you feel that you need to deliver large flies with 7.5 to 10 feet of T-14, go with the 7 weight. You will need the heavier rod to deliver mass of the line, tip, and fly.

For what you want to accomplish, I would recommend the rod weight that you feel would work best in your situation, a shorter Skagit style shooting head with the appropriate tips and running line, and a reel that has the capacity for that fat line.

As for reels, use the CLA 4 with a 6 weight switch and the CLA 5 with a 7 weight switch.

I used to be part of the camp that learning with a full length Spey rod was the way to go for first time Spey casters. Back then the line selections were limited. I have changed my stance recently. With shorter Skagit and Scandi heads, people could learn just as fast with the shorter heads.

A switch rod is not my primary stick for a dry fly rod, but it still can be used as one. Skating large dry flies is an effective way to get a Steelhead. Sometimes I skate a large Chernobyl Ant for trout. Sometimes I'll throw a large hopper. Don't plan on getting pretty presentations.

Just wondering. What kind of input are you getting from the staff at your local shop?

MP
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