View Single Post
  #21 (permalink)  
Old 03-08-2011, 01:47 PM
fyshstykr's Avatar
fyshstykr fyshstykr is online now
Super Moderator

 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Plain City, Utah.
Posts: 4,883
Blog Entries: 1
fyshstykr has a reputation beyond reputefyshstykr has a reputation beyond reputefyshstykr has a reputation beyond reputefyshstykr has a reputation beyond reputefyshstykr has a reputation beyond reputefyshstykr has a reputation beyond reputefyshstykr has a reputation beyond reputefyshstykr has a reputation beyond reputefyshstykr has a reputation beyond reputefyshstykr has a reputation beyond reputefyshstykr has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Upstream or downstream....

Quote:
Originally Posted by kglissmeyer1 View Post
I guess I can count myself in the minority here. I fish a lot and love the opportunity and challenge of presenting a dry fly to actively feeding fish, with a downstream approach my favorite way to do this. Nothing like getting a good drift into a feeding lane and having the fish eat. My preferred method is down and across with a lot of slack in the line. It does take some time to master this method, but to me its my favorite way to fish dry flies and emergers.

Kelly.

I'll stand with you Kelly, as I also prefer a "downstream drift" if possible. I'm sure it's because we've both spent countless hours on the banks of The Henry's Fork just learning by watching some of the best fisherman in the world perfect their craft. For those that have not fished these waters, the "upstream approach and downstream drift" is a tried and true method for fooling these tough Rainbows with dry flies, emerger's, or even softhackles.

This technique allows one to measure their cast almost perfectly by casting above and beyond the target fish and then by raising the rod tip high enough to pull the fly back towards them it's possible to pinpoint exactly where the fly needs to be, and as soon as it's inline simply lower the rod tip and feed slack into the drift. You can literally drop it right in the ol' bucket!

I think you can apply this tactic to smaller waters, but in order to do so you must wade very carefully, lower your profile and keep your cast low to the water.

---------- Post added at 11:47 AM ---------- Previous post was at 11:40 AM ----------

Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnerney View Post
Fysh: You should get a copy of Rene' Harrop's book titled "Learning the Water", it is an excellent read, he has a whole chapter devoted to this subject titled "Fishing the Clock".

Larry
It is a very good book.
Amazon.com: Learning from the Water (9780811705790): Rene Harrop: Books Amazon.com: Learning from the Water (9780811705790): Rene Harrop: Books


As is his first book 'Trout Hunter'.
Amazon.com: Trout Hunter: The Way of an Angler (9780871089229): Rene Harrop, Andre Puyans, John Randolph: Books Amazon.com: Trout Hunter: The Way of an Angler (9780871089229): Rene Harrop, Andre Puyans, John Randolph: Books


Rene is an amazing fisherman, he's one of several that I've watched from the bank/tailgate many times. His natural instincts to find big fish, stalk them, and know what to feed them are second to none. I guess this happens when you live only a few hundred yards from your favorite river. He is a true "Trout Hunter"!
__________________
John.

"Whoever said happiness comes with sunshine, has never known a Steelhead fisherman who prays for Fall rains."




Last edited by fysh; 03-08-2011 at 09:08 PM.
Reply With Quote