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Old 04-18-2011, 09:21 AM
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Default Re: are float tubes worth it??

Quote:
Originally Posted by tanglefoot View Post
I have been debating buying a float tube to fly fish some remote waters. These are cold lakes. Can anyone tell me of their experiences, successes,
pros and cons of tube fishing...
Thanks
ABSOLUTELY!!!!! Nothing beats getting out ON a lake. I started out with a Caddis donut. I have since progressed and now own the ultimate in my opinion, but you really need to start somewhere to KNOW what to look for in the future. I still see old timers in donuts. Not my choice anymore, but they do work.

They are easy to pack, but here are two pros and cons. First, material. Most donuts (good ones) are made of CAR tubes. They are heavier but can be inflated with a bike pump. Next the OUTER material. Nylon, double stitched..... I have seen allot of cheaper covers split no mater how beautiful the seams are. That is like a Ball Park Frank when that happens. Any bladder is fine if it is encased in a GOOD cover.
Most the Doughnut tubes I looked at were 10 to 12 lbs. So with that, understand they make U or V tubes in the 6lb range, and the Escape was at 24 lb is now I hear at 20 lb.

I disagree that flippers are a main issue specially with a doughnut. Any flipper will work fine, but if you tube allot and experience rough water, then the bigger the fin the better and I will add, for me, the stiffer the material for really rough water.
I have Omega's...long and awesome. They are one fin you can actually move on both the up and down stroke just by leaning back and fluttering your feet like a swimmer. They require very little movement to propel you.
But, I also have Force Fins which are a harder/stiffer rubber. They are shaped like a scoop. I prefer them on the big waves to hunker down and scoop my way to shore. BUT, I wear a woman's 9. I have allot of my FF showing so a big blade. Hubby wears a 12/13 and there is ver little fin showing with his foot.
Again, in my opinion, not an issue with a donut, but on a pontoon where you are sitting higher out of the water, a longer fin is a must.
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