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Old 05-14-2011, 04:00 PM
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Frank Whiton Frank Whiton is offline
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Default Re: How to find fishing locations? streams & rivers

Hi dr_wogz,

Besides all of the good information above Topographical maps can be a great help. They are hard to use on your computer unless you have a big screen. I like to see the regular maps. They will show you all kinds of things and aid in finding places.

I looked at MS Maps and there is all kinds of water around you. Most lakes have streams or rivers entering or leaving lakes and these all have potential. I see a large park area north of you that 117 goes right through the middle. Lots of potential them. Get a canoe and you would be good to go. Even with out a boat check out the streams connecting the lakes.

One very important aspect of locating good water is hiking to spots located on your Topographical map studies. You can tell the gradient of the river by the Topo and pick a spot to hike to. One thing I always looked for when starting out in the Sierras was a steep gradient, then a flat area, then a steep gradient leading away from the flat. The flat could be a mile long or only a few hundred yards. These flat areas almost always hold fish.

Frank
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Last edited by Frank Whiton; 05-23-2011 at 02:13 PM.
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