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Old 05-16-2008, 10:40 AM
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Default Re: How to fish a dry fly (beginner's question)

Hi jbu,

Here are some other things you should consider. When casting upstream this should not be directly above you. If you cast directly above you the line will precede the fly and spoke any fish. You need to position the fly line so just the fly passes over the fish. To start with, casting up stream at about a 45 degree angle is a good place to start. After you get some experience you will know how far up stream you want to cast. Dry fly fishing and indicator fishing is all about mending and getting a drag free drift with the fly. The longer distance you can get a drag free drift with your fly the better your chances of hooking up. If you can only get a drag free drift for 10', then you need to position your self so that drag free drift is above the fish. If you are blind casting you need the fly to drift drag free over feeding lanes or seams in the water. With short cast you can raise your rod tip to take up the line as it floats down stream. Do this instead of stripping in line. When the tip is high enough you can throw the slack line back up stream with a flick of your wrist. This is a very useful technique.

You need to learn the reach cast and use it on your up stream cast. You need to reach cast with either hand according to which direction the water is flowing. You don't have to cast with both hands, you just need to do the reach with both hands. Another very useful cast is the "S" cast. I use the "S" cast a lot for down stream cast. You get a short drag free float but it is great if you spot a fish directly below you. I find the reach and "S" cast the two cast I use the most.

Frank
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