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Old 06-22-2011, 05:30 PM
silver creek silver creek is online now
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Wisconsin
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Default Re: Bending the wrist and tailing loops

I am not having any problem casting. I am having a problem understanding how bending the wrist "often" causes a tailing loop.

My understanding is that bending the wrist creates a "windshield" wiper effect with the rod tip going in a rounder arc, producing a more convex rod tip path, which causes more of an open loop. The only way I know that bending the wrist can "cause" a closed loop is if the caster bends the wrist on the backcast to produce an open loop directed downward on the backcast and then directs the forward cast without bending the wrist with a SLP forward and overhead to a normal stop.

Similarly, delaying the forward cast after a normal back cast can let the fly line fall below the rod tip path of the forward cast, causing a closed or tailing loop.

Both can cause a tailing loop because the low line position on the backcast starts the fly line from below the SLP of the forward cast. So the path of the trailing fly line crosses over the path of the standing line that is connected to the rod tip once the loop is formed by the stop.

However, a caster that flops the wrist on the backcast will almost always do the same on the forward cast. This leads to open loops on both the back and forward casts and not closed loops.

It seemed illogical to me to say that the same casting motion of breaking the wrist can "often" cause both open loops and closed loops which we know are the opposite of each other. We know that the most frequent cause of a closed loop is shocking (bending) the rod with a sudden application of acceleration and rather than too much wrist motion.

I am open to new ideas so when I don't understand a casting post, I wonder if I am missing something that I didn't know. Hence, I asked for an explanation of what I don't understand.
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Regards,

Silver



"Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought"..........Szent-Gyorgy
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