View Single Post
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 06-22-2011, 11:25 PM
rangerrich99's Avatar
rangerrich99 rangerrich99 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Anthem, AZ
Posts: 344
rangerrich99 is a name known to allrangerrich99 is a name known to allrangerrich99 is a name known to allrangerrich99 is a name known to allrangerrich99 is a name known to allrangerrich99 is a name known to all
Default Re: Bending the wrist and tailing loops

As I am still learning to cast properly (I have only been flyfishing for about 3 years), take this with a grain of salt.

Last year I noticed while casting on a day when I wasn't catching a lot of fish that I got tailing loops when I stopped my forearm early in the forward stroke and then allowed my wrist to tip or rock forward. Since that day, I've made a concerted effort to eliminate this tipping motion in my shorter casts, and this seems to have cured my tailing loop issues in these situations.

This year, I finally learned to double haul with some consistency, but I've noticed more knots in my tippets again, consistently within 4-6 inches of the fly. After reading some of the posts in this thread, I believe that I probably am waiting too long on my back cast to start my forward cast, resulting in line drop and then tailing loops.

Of course, I've noticed that regardless of how I cast, my wrist bends to some degree on every cast. But I think after watching some videos, that at least for me, my problems with tailing loops come when I allow that tipping motion (the rod actually gets to horizontal of even pointed slightly downward at the end of a stroke).

As to opening a loop, I've been working on that as well, and I get my best results when I allow the rod tip to drift down about 6 inches, after my rod stop. My problem is, that this is an extra thing to do while double hauling; kind of like patting your head, rubbing your tummy, and crossing/uncrossing your toes all at the same time. needless to say, I don't always get it right.
__________________
"Three-fourths of the Earth's surface is water, and one-fourth is land. It is quite clear that the good Lord intended us to spend triple the amount of time fishing as taking care of the lawn." ~Chuck Clark
Reply With Quote