Thread: Overloaded
View Single Post
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 02-05-2005, 01:07 PM
dougm's Avatar
dougm dougm is offline
Cast Like A Pro
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 342
dougm will become famous soon enoughdougm will become famous soon enough
Default

Unless your rod manufacturer screwed up (that happens), I generally oppose overlining with the exception of close-in work --30 to 40-feet or less.

The reason is the actual weight of the line compared to line weight aerialized during the cast. I've explained my reasoning before, most recently in a product update on Cortland's new 444 Precision Taper half-step llines. You might want to read the article:
http://www.activeangler.com/articles...444SLTrout.asp

The only line I've found that is an exception to the rule is Cortland's Classice 444 Sylk I also recently review. The 5-weight Sylk cast equally well on rods from 4 to 6-weight. Of course, the Sylk is quite different in its characteristics from other lines. That review is available at both Active Angler or Land Big Fish.com.

In the heavier weights - 9 through 12 - I always underline ... sometimes one but more frequently, two line weights. In fact, for long casting, my favorite rig is a light 12-weight that sends Cortland's old 444SL XRL a very long way.

You can find a further discussion of line weigjhts in a series (actually a chapter) from my book, Fly Fishing for the Rest of Us, called, All About Lines. It is available at either site.

Overlining is a gimmick used by a number instructors and schools simply because it shortens the time it takes to get the student to "feel" the rod load. I prefer to teach the student to watch the backcast and "see" the rod load. Down the road, overling leads to collapsed casts and broken rods...

Hope this helps.
__________________
http://www.thefullcreel.com/files/data/SigforumDM.jpg
Forum Moderator

Fly Fishing with Doug Macnair
www.douglasmacnair.com
Reply With Quote