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Old 06-19-2008, 12:32 AM
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Default Re: Overlooking Midge Larva?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joni View Post
Very Nice!
Thanks Joni.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ezamora View Post
I find it interesting that you used a straight shanked hook for your midge larvae fly. i usually see them tied with curved shanks. is there a reason for this? i've never fished midges in any form but know i should and will try whenever i go fishing again. whenever that will be...
Most midge larva patterns I've seen are tied with a straight shank hook but I don't think that's as important as a uniform diameter from front to rear and keeping your pattern as thin as possible. The pattern used for this article is a Phil Rowley fly called the Frostbite Bloodworm and is tied on a Mustad Signature R72.

Quote:
Originally Posted by smythe View Post
I fish quite a few midge larva patterns. Can you recommend any midge emerger patterns?
I rarely fish emerger patterns except when nothing else seams to be working. Here are a few patterns I do like though.

CDC Emerger
Click the image to open in full size.

This fly will keep it's body just under the surface while the hackle will sit in the film and the post will be on the surface.

For tying recipe go here

Shuttlecock Buzzer
Click the image to open in full size.

This fly will stay just under the surface for a little while then eventually starts to sink but slowly so it's very effective as an emerger.

For tying recipe go here

You can also take any chironomid pattern, remove the bead head and make it a parasol emerger.

Click the image to open in full size.

Click here
to see how

Hope this helps.

Cheers,
Doc
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