View Single Post
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 07-20-2011, 10:39 AM
silver creek silver creek is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 1,914
silver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: dry fly presentation?

Quote:
Originally Posted by mac. View Post
so today i went out and nymphed for about 2 hours. nothin... i saw about 10-15 drakes flying around so i thought id throw one on and try, well i tried a dry dropper rig or whatever its called when you put a nymph under a dry. i didnt get nothin in about an hour, i walked down the stream constantly casting trying all water. i did notice that sometimes my fly would be on its side or upside down. does this matter? if so how do i fix this? i know i suck at dry casting but i dont feel like thats the problem.
Just because there are insects in the air does not mean those same insects are on or in the water. So I am not surprised no fish took the fly. Even when there are insect on the water does not guarantee the fish are taking them. If you saw a rise and you actually saw the fish take that insect, then your question is valid.

About the the fly not landing correctly, there are several possible reasons. The first is that it is a poorly tied dry fly and would tip over even if there were no dropper. This can occur on parachute flies for example, where some of the hackle hangs lower on one side than the other. Or it can happen with comparaduns and sparkle duns with an asymmetric wing or even aymmetric tail fibers that are tilted lower on one side than the other. So carefully examine the fly.

The second reason is leader twist either from an aerodynamically unstable dry fly that spins during the cast OR by an oval casting motion. Both will twist the leader and the torque of the leader will torque the fly on its side. To diagnose twist, lift the fly up and see if the leader spins the fly.

A dry fly lying on its side is not normal. There is a cause, you just need to find it.
__________________
Regards,

Silver



"Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought"..........Szent-Gyorgy
Reply With Quote