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Old 08-03-2011, 08:44 AM
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Default Re: Best way to more distance ?

Here's what I've learned from my own trials and tribulations with long distance fly casting:

There are different ways to do things.

For me, hauling too far can cause problems when I execute the upward haul and then add slack to the line. I believe it's important to to finish the upward haul level with my rod hand. To do this, it's important to stop my cast and downward haul at the same time. (I begin my haul and cast moving both my hands together, then when I begin my power acceleration, I begin my downward haul. I learned this from the great Canadian caster Gord Deval.)

Also, shooting line on my last back cast helps, so will adding a slight drift move. (When the line unrolls about 2/3 of the way, slowly lower the rod tip a bit.)

Using a closed stance, like the caster in the video, will allow for more hip rotation and power on our forward cast, but it will also make it harder - especially for us older guys - to watch our back cast unroll without moving our rear shoulder back and adding slack.

Generally, with a shooting line we use less overhang. If you want to increase your overhang try a double taper lline.

Finally, when making very long false casts, I wouldn't wait for the line to unroll. I begin my next cast when the line resembles the shape of a candy cane. (I learned this from Jim Gunderson, a multiple winner of the Best-of-the-West casting tournament.)

In the end, there's not one technique that will allow us to cast farther, but many. Also, there are different casting styles. It's important not to get caught up between them.

My too cents.

Randy
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