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Old 08-05-2011, 01:03 PM
peregrines peregrines is offline
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Default Re: Southern Mayland Salt Newbie

Hey Robert, welcome to the forum.

You've got great advice from Ard (Hardyreels) and Paul (Riptide). I also chase striped bass, but a little further north here in NY on Long Island.

As Rip Tide said, just a basic assortment of flies- a fistfull of some clousers and deceivers and you'll be in business.

Another thing you'll want to add though is a stripping basket to hold your loose fly line out of the water-- this is the amount of line you expect to shoot on your casts when wading. The shooting basket will add a lot of distance to your casts since it will reduce the amount of friction you'd have to overcome to rip the line out of the water before sending it through the guides-- because you'll be using a sinking/intermediate line, you'd have to pull the slack line through several inches of water as you false cast before you can get it in the air. Even with a floating fly line, a shooting basket is helpful because the current will grab your slack line. It also keeps your slack line from getting caught in seaweed etc. You can buy a shooting basket, but you can also very easily make them yourself and save $. Here's a youtube video of a semi elaborate one--

I just use a regular rubbermaid dishpan with a hole in the top of the rim on each of the short sides and a shock cord with 2 hooks. The shock cord goes around my back, each hook goes in the hole of one of the short sides and done. No drain holes, no screw type things sticking up to reduce tangles etc. That way I can also use the shooting basket to throw wet stuff in the back of the truck.

Scout around and look for inlets, jetties, flats next to deep channels/drop offs and other places with structure that might hold fish. Points of land are a good place to target since you can usually move around to find a place where the wind isn't in your teeth. Google earth can be a big help to find spots to explore. And keep an eye out for areas where folks might be casting stuff from shore like bucktails, tins, Bombers or other light plugs with light 9' spinning rods (as opposed to the big sticks used in the high surf)-- these are often perfect fly rod spots. Local tackle shops and weekly fishing rags can also give you some idea of places to target and will have tide and current tables. (Note that you'll generally want to fish moving water ie current, and the timing of tides and currents can be quite different.) This time of year, your best bet is probably going to be periods of low light-- dawn, dusk, and night.

If there's a possibility you'll be out after dark, at a minimum you'll want a small water proof flash light on a lanyard you can wear around your neck hands free or a water proof head or neck light. After your eyes adjust to the darkness, there's usually plenty of ambient light, but you'll want a flashlight or lamp on occasion.

It would be a good idea to start a log also- to record spots you fished, moon phase, tide stages and prevailing wind, presence/type of bait in the water, fish caught by you or others, birds crashing bait etc. Over time you'll notice patterns - where/when to fish under different conditions

This time of year the fishing can be tough--- but it should be getting better soon as towards the end of the month into the fall. Striped bass (rockfish), bluefish, fluke (summer flounder), weakfish, and towards september you may also have occasional shots at schools of false albacore, spanish mackeral and bonito.

More than anything though don't get frustrated and put your time in. More than likely you'll run into many fishless days, especially in mid summer-- but then one day you'll find yourself in the right place at the right time and all "heck" will break loose.

Keep asking questions!
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