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Old 08-15-2011, 04:29 PM
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kglissmeyer1 kglissmeyer1 is offline
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Default Re: Am I doing something WRONG?

It appears to me to be the old "Buggy Whip" cast. I'm not sure how long you've been fly fishing, but this is a common occurrence with relative beginners due to no being quite patient enough yet to allow the backcast to stretch out before proceeding with the forward cast. And, yes, breaking of the wrists does come into play, either that or using too much arm and dropping the cast front and back. Both of these will cause the line to essentially act like a buggy whip, especially when the caster speeds up the stroke in order to compensate for the line drooping and dropping; finally the fly hits the end of the leader and a sharp "crack" or "Pop" will sound which results in spray over the water on the forward cast and snapping the fly off of the tippet during the backcast, without hitting any object, simple physics.

Take some time to practice casting over the water with a fly attached with the hook point removed, or dry cast over grass. Power the front and forward casts as needed to keep the fly in the air, but tuck in your elbow to keep from allowing too much arm, and/or try a three-point grip with your forefinger on top of the cork in order to keep from allowing too much break from your wrists. Also, concentrate on stopping your casting stroke closer to 11 and 1 on the casting clock, allowing the line to stretch out before continuing the stroke. Keep power in your strokes, just don't take them down so far, this is fairly easy if you can remember to keep your hand traveling on a level plane with the ground during the stroke rather than down-up-down. The key is allowing the line to straighten before continuing with the next stroke. Even turn your head and watch your backcast in order to time it and allow it to straighten. Use a small amount of line at first and then lengthen the cast by feeding line into it. Soon you'll be laying out those long velvety casts that will be the envy of all who see you.

Hope this helps. Now, if you can just help figure out the right fly for those super smart browns on my favorite spring creek, we'll be even.

Kelly.
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