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Old 08-29-2011, 10:43 AM
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Default Re: Upstream Nymphing: Slack or Tight Line?

Silver Creek,

Great, great answer. So after making a tuck cast my nymph will have, I assume, a very short drift, because I'm fishing on tight line and my line on the surface is moving faster than my fly on the bottom and soon I'll have no slack in my leader.

In short, once my leader is tight my fly will drag.

Last year I was fishing with a very good angler. I didn't know anything about upstream nymphing. The angler was fishing a fast seam at the head of the pool. He was nymphing upstream without an indicator. After making a cast, he retrieved a lot of tight line. Looking back, I can't see how his fly didn't drag during most of his retrieve.

Randy

---------- Post added at 09:43 AM ---------- Previous post was at 08:40 AM ----------

P.S. I would imagine that many times when I was nymphing with an indicator I was wasting my time because of the slack I had in my leader between the indicator and fly. If a trout took my fly but didn't move far enough to take the slack out of my leader, the indicator didn't move and I didn't know I had a strike.

I fish small streams that are covered with overhanging branches. The streams are therefore fairly dark and it's hard to see a trout take my fly; so I guess I'm often damned if I use an indicator and damned if I don't.

Perhaps when I'm using an indicator I'm better off if I can put most of the lack in the line not the leader.

Or am I just thinking too much?

Randy
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