Thread: New to salt
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Old 08-30-2011, 10:51 AM
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Default Re: New to salt

Quote:
Originally Posted by ccnp11 View Post
I was considering going with a 5-6 weight rod as a starter and wait until the spring to go heavier...I'm definitely going to go hunting tarpon as soon as they are running but I'll get that equipment later. For now, I'd like a versatile combo that I can take out prospecting and not be to terribly under-gunned while still having enough beef in the rod to handle what I find and get the line where it needs to go.
I am erring towards a seven or an eight weight as a lighter rig. Besides the possibility of hooking into a homie, you need the rod to have the ability to throw some rather large flies into the wind.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ccnp11 View Post
But if I'm completely nuts for thinking 5-6 will be enough please say so.
You are freakin' nuts.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wjc View Post
I would check with your local fly shop and/or fly fishing club when you get there before making a decision.
Darn good advice. It is hard to beat the local knowledge.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ccnp11 View Post
What are the better saltwater rod brands? Sage? Loomis?
Sage and Loomis make quality rods. I would also add Scott, Hardy, and Winston to the mix. Cast them all, and choose which one works best for you.

Don't forget about quality reels. For saltwater fishing, Tibor, Abel, and Mako rule the scene for a reason. They don't fail.

As your quiver grows, you may want to consider backup gear. Saltwater fish are terribly hard on gear (especially the rods). Also you may want to switch presentations. It is quicker to grab another rig that may have a different line and fly combination than it is to change spools and/or tie new flies on.

Dennis
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