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Old 09-22-2011, 01:20 PM
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Default Re: The Photography Chat Thread;

Ard,
Regarding the Moon Over Homestake Peak B/W shot on the other thread.
This was shot with a 300mm Sigma and a Sigma 2X tele converter. The aperture was was wide open at probably f8 (don't know for sure because of the addition of the 2X). Shutter speed was 1/15 second. Adding the 2X contributed to the somewhat fuzziness in the moon. You really need high end lenses (Canon/Nikon etc.) when using a tele converter to get a truly tack sharp shot. The lens was mounted on a tripod and exposed using Mirror Lock up and a remote trigger.
Best time to shoot the setting moon is the day after the true full moon and the day before for the rising moon. This will give you some extra ambient light on the surrounding objects in your shot as it will be closer to the sun rise/set. Of course if you are just shooting the moon itself, the true full moon is best. I expose for the moon itself metering with spot meter setting right on the moon. Bracketing also helps if you are still shooting film, which this shot was done on.
Here's a handy little free download that can help you plan your moon rise/set photography.
The Photographer's Ephemeris | Plan your shoot
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