View Single Post
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 10-06-2011, 11:21 AM
silver creek silver creek is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 2,134
silver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond repute
Default Difference between a Roll Cast and a Standard Cast

Rather than comment on a previous post about low power on roll casts:

Low power on roll cast

I decided this deserved a thread of it's own.

Some of you are familiar with the Casting Analyzer.

Explanation of the casting analyzer graph is below:
Click the image to open in full size.


Jason's Borger has posted the difference between a standard overhead cast and a roll cast in terms of rod "butt" rotation. Take a look at his blog for other casting articles. Jason's Blog:



Graph from Jason's Blog, the top graph is the stardard cast and the bottom is the roll cast.:

Click the image to open in full size.

The difference between the two graphs is that the final (accelertion) rod loading for a roll cast must occur over a shorter time and have a higher peak. It requires more energy to make a roll cast because part of the energy is used to both elevate the line and to break the line free of surface tension.

The standard casting instruction for the roll cast has been that it is just the same as the a regular forward cast. We can see that that is not quite correct. If you look at the white side of the graph, the initial front part of the curve (from about 37 to 55 ms) is identical UNTIL the final steep acceleration from 55 to 58 ms. So the final application of power is more sudden and forceful than an in the air cast.

The other thing to notice is that even though the final acceleration is more sudden and rapid, it is still SMOOTH. There are no dips in the acceleration line.

So a roll cast requires a faster rod rotation over a shorter time.
__________________
Regards,

Silver



"Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought"..........Szent-Gyorgy

Last edited by Hardyreels; 10-06-2011 at 01:11 PM. Reason: Removed link directing members to privat blog
Reply With Quote