View Single Post
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 10-07-2011, 11:41 AM
silver creek silver creek is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 2,031
silver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Difference between a Roll Cast and a Standard Cast

I got my geek on and commented on the Jason's Blog:



"Jason,

As a geek, I found the graphs very interesting. I never realized that there was a difference between a roll cast and a standard cast in terms of casting dynamics. We are often told that the roll cast is just 1/2 of a standard cast and they are identical. Apparently there are differences that I think are significant, and it explains to me why beginners find a good roll cast to be difficult.

If I remember my physics correctly:

I would guess the higher peak and more rapid angular acceleration is needed in a roll cast, because a greater force over time is required to both lift the line up against the pull of gravity and to break the line free of surface tension. Force over time is work, so the forward roll cast takes more work than the forward half of an in-the-air cast.

If I remember correctly, work should be the area under the curves for both these graphs. Work is the integral of force over time. But the difference in not only the total amount of work done for each cast.

The graphs also show that the main application of the angular acceleration is contracted into a shorter time frame for the roll cast than with the in-the-air cast. I don't know if this is true, but this suggest to me that timing is more critical with a roll cast than an in the air cast. This is another way of saying that the acceleration is smoother with the in-the-air cast, and the roll cast requires the extra "umph" at just the right time and in just the right amount.

Don't know if I am right about my musings. We need a professor of physics to sort it all out."
__________________
Regards,

Silver



"Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought"..........Szent-Gyorgy
Reply With Quote