View Single Post
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 10-22-2011, 09:09 AM
sweetandsalt's Avatar
sweetandsalt sweetandsalt is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: -
Posts: 2,333
sweetandsalt has a brilliant futuresweetandsalt has a brilliant futuresweetandsalt has a brilliant futuresweetandsalt has a brilliant futuresweetandsalt has a brilliant futuresweetandsalt has a brilliant futuresweetandsalt has a brilliant futuresweetandsalt has a brilliant futuresweetandsalt has a brilliant futuresweetandsalt has a brilliant futuresweetandsalt has a brilliant future
Default Re: What is Happening in Twin Bridges?

Jackster, I have no knowlege of a "Winston Board" is this connected with their web site? I'll look. My notion for this tread eminated from the previous thread in this forum concerning a not particularly relevant comparison between a Winston and T&T rod model. Please note my "wrap" remark was not addressing the tread work, which remains fine but rather the coating of the tread wraps. The short cut of applying a single coat of relativly viscous polymer to the rotating rod as opposed to applying multiple coats of thin finish is obviously a time, craftsmansip and, hence, money saver. Most factory rods from both the US and abroad utilize this technique. Fine cane rod makers, from whom our fundimental aesthetic is derived (perhaps yet another thread topic) mostly do not do this. Regarding Winston, who like you, I have been familiar with for a long time, I test cast a brand new #5 BIIIx this past spring and noted the bulbus globs of epoxy (or whatever) finish. I pulled from my own quiver an infrequently fished, several year old BIIx #4 and an earler still WT3 model and noted that the finish was not as thick but still of a one-coat overlapping onto the blank style. Look at a Tom Morgan Rodsmith rod, a T&T and I even checked out an Orvis Western circa 1986 and the finish is glossy but flat and stops where the thread stops as it should.

Big deal? Here is why I care: I am a fan of the old and new generations of rod designers and the technological advances they have utilized from Tonkin Cane (developed for the furniture building industry) to Nano Silica and carbon fiber compression (developed for the military and jumbo commercial jet industry). As rod blanks become smaller in diameter, thinner and more uniform wall thicknes and overall lighter in weight, the more impact the combined mass of guides, thread and wrap finish have on their designed action. Contemporary designers are using smaller guides made of thinner, lighter alloys to counteract their impact on the blanks flex.

I do not like miniscule snake guides because of their negative effect on feeding slack into a downstream, dry fly, extended dead drift. I want our most modern rods to use a little bigger, light weight set of guides whoes slight mass increase is counteracted by thinner, shorter, less bulky finish rather than mass increasing-to-no-benifit-whatsoever, hard and flex inhibiting globs of guck to seal otherwise carefully and snugly wraped tread.
Reply With Quote