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Old 10-22-2011, 10:37 AM
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Default Re: What is Happening in Twin Bridges?

Craftsmanship is often a matter of ballance; neat and clean yet stong and durable. The thread wraps must be full sealed for durability and longevity and the gap where the tread rises up over the guide foot needs to be fully sealed to prevent intrusion of corrosive salt or abrasive particulates. Cane builders generally use thin refined varnish that eventually cracks requiring refinishing. Glass and graphite rod makers utilize epoxy or polyester polymers in keeping with the Plastic nature of our modern rods which should last the life of the rod. By the way, often used rods' polymer matrix does break down with micro fracturing of the bond between fiber and polymer. A repeatedly flexed, daily used guide's rod feels softer campared to a brand new same-model version after a couple of seasons of hard use. Not to digress...seal the thread and guide gap, yes; have even the slightest bulge form in a wrap finish means excess polymer was applied adding useless mass and stiffness - bad craftsmanship.

PS: I went to the Winston Board and found narry a negative comment about anything Winston. To paraphrase the dead comedian, George Carlan: "I'm not too prejudiced against Winston, I can find something critical to say about all graphite rod companies".
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