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Old 11-19-2011, 01:57 PM
peregrines peregrines is offline
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Default Re: Some basic tying techniques

Continued from above...

Angle Wrap
In this example we will be mounting a tail at the start of the body which will be directly above the barb of the hook

Here we're using the bobbin as a plumb bob in line with the hook barb, and have reached the end of the straight part of the shank
Click the image to open in full size.

Pinch wrapping stiffer materials seems to work at first....
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But after the initial pinch wrap the when we take additional tight turns, the thread torque tends to roll the material off to the far side of the shank.
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Instead we can use the thread torque to our advantage in an Angle Wrap. Positioning the butts on the near side of the shank pointing down at an angle....
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--- take a tight turn and use the thread torque to ride the material on to the top of then shank.. Once the material has been "torqued" into position, bind it down with additional tiuht wraps of thread.
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Soft Loop Wrap
to be added


Isolation Wrap
Can be used to attach bundles of fibers to position them precisely, or to provide distinct bands of color in a multicolored bucktail wing. It can also be used after the material is secured to provide definition and strengthen divided wings of flank fiber or hair and provide a firm thread foundation for wrapping hackle on parachute posts. Here we'll use it to build a 2 color brown over white bucktail wing with distinct separation between colors

Hold the material of the first (white) layer in position above the shank and take a loop of thread around just the material (not the shank)
Click the image to open in full size.

Slide the looped material down into position while maintaining tension on the bobbin to close the distance between the material and the shank and take a couple of wraps over both the material and the shank.
Click the image to open in full size.

After binding the butts of the first layer, trimming them with an angle cut, wrap a firm foundation for the next ( brown) layer of the wing. Attach the next bundle with another isolation wrap, secure, angle cut excess and bind down butts
Click the image to open in full size.

Here's a comparison of two bucktail streamers using different wrap techniques for the wing.
Left:
Stacked bunches put on by pinch wraps, less distinct transition between white and brown layers

Right:
Wing assembled with isolation wraps-- a thread wrap just around the wing material before attaching to the shank gives a marked separation of layers.
Click the image to open in full size.


Slide Wrap
Used when materials may difficult to initially tie in to proper length, it's a way of securing material with a couple of semi loose wraps and then adjusting the length of material.

Tie in material with a couple loose turns. In this case we want a feather extending to rear, 1/2 the length of body
Click the image to open in full size.

Slide material by pulling stem of feather through loops to front until desired length then secure with tight wraps to lock in place.
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Lock Wrap for tying in synthetics and other slippery materials. Here' we're using Silver Mylar Saltwater Width Flashabou

Leave a tag end and tie to shank using a pinch wrap. Take a couple tight turns....
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....Fold tag end back and take a couple of tight turns sandwiching the material against the shank
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Distribution Wrap A method for "distributing" materials evenly around a hook shank, can be done over a thread base but works even better around a bare shank

First squish materials around the hook shank and hold in place with a firm pinch with your material hand
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Take a couple of tight wraps
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And pull the bobbin towards you-- the thread torque will help to spread material out 360 degrees around the shank
Click the image to open in full size.
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Last edited by peregrines; 11-19-2011 at 02:56 PM.
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