View Single Post
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 11-18-2008, 04:52 PM
Hardyreels's Avatar
Hardyreels Hardyreels is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Wasilla / Skwentna, Alaska
Posts: 11,549
Blog Entries: 69
Hardyreels has a reputation beyond reputeHardyreels has a reputation beyond reputeHardyreels has a reputation beyond reputeHardyreels has a reputation beyond reputeHardyreels has a reputation beyond reputeHardyreels has a reputation beyond reputeHardyreels has a reputation beyond reputeHardyreels has a reputation beyond reputeHardyreels has a reputation beyond reputeHardyreels has a reputation beyond reputeHardyreels has a reputation beyond repute
Send a message via Yahoo to Hardyreels Send a message via Skype™ to Hardyreels
Default Are you fishing for Brook Trout?

Click the image to open in full size.

Tying;

Hook: Your favorite streamer hook in size 2 - 8
Tail: Three small bunches of hackle fibers stacked; white, black, red, bottom up
Body: Rear 2/3 cream floss, front is pink floss
Tinsel Ribbing: Medium gold flat tinsel
Throat:3 bunches of hackle fibers stacked same as the tail
Wing: 2 Grizzly hackles with 2 green hackles over them. The green are painted with red & yellow spots down the quill
Cheeks: jungle Cock eyes
Head: The fly in the picture is very old (circa 1980) the head was built up with thread for profile and then painted olive green with a white chin. This can be much more simple, just use olive thread and finish it off. However I would not skip the spots on the wing, if you go to the trouble of tying these you may as well stick with Dr. Oatman's original design.



Since we now have a Brook trout Pictures thread I thought it time to bring this back. If you want to catch a brookie with one of the most traditional streamers ever made for them get your materials sorted and start working on these. I know you've seen this fly on the cover of magazines and in the books but have you ever used it for Brookies? They are a bit of a chore to create and a bit of a heart breaker if you loose one but I fished them in Pennsylvania's Slate Run for many years with great success. Admittedly many flies will work to catch a Brook Trout but these always seemed so right to me. You know those big guys are eating the little guys so why not tie up the Oatman Brook Trout Minnow for late fall and the spring fishing to come?

Note that if you're going to stay the course and make them true to the original you've got to paint that head olive and white. Tying streamers in winter is kinda like going back to when you used to build model cars and planes in winter when you were a kid. You did build models, right?

I had some time on my hands today and thought I'd try to stir the mix and get people thinking about the traditional fishing flies that started this all. This is an unused piece from my collection tied circa 1990, I have about 6 in my streamer wallet in various stages of being torn apart from the teeth of fish. Since moving to Alaska I use them in the fall for Dolly Varden Char, a fall spawner.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg DSC_01060001.JPG (92.9 KB, 91 views)

Last edited by Hardyreels; 07-25-2011 at 01:17 PM.
Reply With Quote