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Old 01-03-2012, 01:11 PM
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Default Re: Fly rod line rating, power, and action - an explanation.

If these interpretive writings are to start towards likes, preferences and what can be expected from a personal performance standpoint.
Then one more element, dampening should be included into the " Fly rod line rating, power and action " equation.

Is anyone saying that there are not medium fast flex profile rods that don't dampen as fast or faster than some of their fast flex profile counterparts?

Dampening has a great deal to do with sensory response and how casters perceive, interpret and react to what a rod is doing during the cast. In a practical sense, dampening is every bit as important to ones connection with a rod as flex profile. What appeals to one caster and eludes another about the same rod, is the mixture of all the elements, more so than any single element or characteristic. This helps explain why some people find rods of greatly different make up, appealing to use for essentially the same application.

Another function of quicker dampening rods can be improved distance. A rod whose tip will not stop oscillating during the shoot will often have tell tale waves traveling down it's running line, which rob energy from the downrange flight. The quicker that tip comes to rest, the less likely those waves are to form. However, drift or bobble, the inability to stop the tip travel at the end of the stroke can also result in waves.

As hard as it would be to quantify on a person by person basis, along with all the above issues already presented, the physicality of the caster has a great deal to do with the outcome. While this can be a contentious topic, stature, muscle response and yes strength all play a role and often reflect themselves in line load preferences, rod length and action.

It's been interesting getting to know you through your thoughts on this subject, I'll tune in as time permits.

Thanks all, TT


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I reserve the right to revise and extend my remarks - if it's good enough for congress.

Last edited by trout trekker; 01-03-2012 at 05:39 PM.
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