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Old 02-12-2012, 06:36 PM
silver creek silver creek is offline
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Default Re: What have you been tying today?

Quote:
Originally Posted by fire instructor View Post
Silver - These look great, but I have a question (or two). I found some on-line instruction for the TransparAnt here: Tying & Fishing the TransparANT by Harrison Steeves, but it doesn't specify how you color the epoxy. My presumption in reading it, that the epoxy is clear or transluscent, and the thread color is what we are seeing. Is that accurate? Also, what epoxy did you use?
I've known Steeves for a long time from a different FF list. As the article states the original TransparAnt was a tedious process of epoxy and thread, with the thread forming the body, coated in epoxy.

The improved method uses glass beads. I use one bead for the thorax and two for the abdominal segment. I tie mine differently than Harrison. I put 3 beads on the hook and put the hook in the vise.

Then I use a thread, the same color as the bead, and lay a base over the hook. Keep building up the base until the first bead fits tightly over the thread base and push it into position. Then push the other two beads over the thread base leaving a space between them and the front bead for the hackle legs.

The thread should now be in front of the first bead and the bead should be well back from the eye of the hook so that when the bead is coated, the eye will not be clogged. Adjust the front bead position and place a few wraps of thread to form a "dam" of thread to keep the front bead from moving forward.

Then take the thread back with a single wrap over the front bead to between the thorax and abdominal beads. You need to make a few wraps of thread behind the front bead and another in front of the abdominal bead.

Then take the thread back between the two abdominal beads while holding the 3rd rear bead so it is flush against the 2nd bead. Fill in the notch between the beads with some thread wraps and then take a thread wrap over the rear bead. Take two wraps to hold that bead forward and then whip finish behind that bead and cut off the thread.

You can use epoxy as the article says but I use Clear Cure Goo, an UV cured acrylic resin. I use a flat toothpick to coat the beads and the thread to form the smooth body. Try to keep the acrylic off of the thread base between the thorax and abdomen so you can tie the hackle on a compressible thread base.

It the acrylic gets on the vice or a surface it cleans off with 70% isopropyl alcohol or the alcohol based hand sanitizers. Cure and harden the CCG with the CCG curing light. The thread wraps over beads will disappear.

The regular CCG cures with a tack, but they now make a tack free formulation. I would recommend that formula. I coat the bodies with a coat of Sally Hansen's because my CCG is the older formula.

If anyone want to try the CCG and needs the CCG UV light, they can get mine at a discount. PM me. I bought a more powerful light.

Note that on the red body, the bead is translucent and you can see into the red body. The black beads are opaque so they look solid.

Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.
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Regards,

Silver

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