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Old 03-05-2012, 11:38 PM
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Default Re: walleye fly fishing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rockriver View Post
What weight do you recommend for walleye useing a single handed rod? What type of line, floating, sink tip, or what? I appriciate any info you can give.
Sorry I missed your post for a few days. A six weight is fine in most cases. You are aware I'm sure, you can cast heavier flies better on a heavier rod, plus you can cast farther. There are situations where a 10wt. would not be out of line. I tend not to look at rods as a 'this fish = this weight rod' idea. I look at it as I need to deliver a specific fly a certain distance and that's how I decide what to use. The waters, the prevailing location of the fish at the time, all play a role in what rod you should use. So when I say a six weight rod will be fine in most cases, that's probably a fair statement, but don't go out a buy a six weight based on that. If you were going to go out and buy just one rod to fish Walleye, an eight weight might be better for the days where you need the bigger flies and longer casts. Let me ask you a quick question or three. What rods do you have now? Where are you planning to fish? Do you tie flies?

As for the line, again this is a thing that changes. Most of the time when I used a single hand rod for them I used an intermediate line. Now that I'm using a Spey Rod, I use a floating line virtually all the time. I have however, when I needed to get deeper, gone to a longer leader. Early this last summer I was casting a 20' leader. Before you freak out on that one, I never use less than a 15' leader anyway, so it's not that much of an adjustment. You would have a lot of trouble casting a leader that long on a single hand rod but the longer leader thing may still help you one of these days.

I want to toss a couple things into this real quick. I do fish with regular gear, on what may be one of the best Walleye lakes on Earth. I am good at it, but since I started going after them with fly rods, I have changed my mind about alot of what Walleye do. Especially big Walleye. My Canadian friend that I fish with and I have in three years only managed to get about a half dozen Walleye under the 19 1/2" slot we have here. When I say about, it's because Bill got one that was right about the 19 1/2" and we let it go without slapping a tape on it. Between the two of us this Fall never got a Walleye smaller than 24 1/2". I seriously don't think there is a better way to get big Walleye than fly fishing. Bill by the way, fishes with a single hand rod. You don't need to flinging flies into the next county with a 15' Spey Rod most of the time. I do think you have an advantage with a Spey Rod though. Late this last Fall was one of those times where it was an advantage. Bill is a world class distance caster, but you can cast farther with a big Spey Rod. Most of the fish were way way out. Someday I will make him start using a Spey Rod. By the way, I'm building a 17' 11wt. Spey Rod, and I wish I had it last Fall. I would have caught more fish, but keep in mind this is big water here. Your mileage may vary.

By the way it would help me a lot if I could google Earth the waters you plan to fish. That would give me some basis for advice.
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