Thread: Whats next???
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Old 03-13-2012, 01:07 PM
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Default Re: Whats next???

hey chzheadguy- welcome to the forum and welcome to fly tying--

Starting with a woolly bugger is a good first step-- you've learned some good techniques that will come in hand on other patterns down the road and it's a productive fly to fish.

Working your way up from easy to more difficult flies is also a good way to go.

You might want to add some nymphs-- good ones to start with are Pheasant Tail Nymphs and Gold Ribbed Hare's Ear Nymphs. More difficult to tie, but also definitely worth learning are some Copper Johns and Prince Nymphs. I would tie all these nymphs with bead heads--Nymphs can be very effective fished alone, but I think you'll find a fishing with a dry fly/dropper combination will also be very common way to fish out there in streams-- using a large dry like a hopper or stimulator with a beadhead nymph tied to the bend of the dry with a short piece of tippet. Hete's a link to a virtual Tie-Along" that member Pocono did recently with step by step instructions and pics on tying up several nymph patterns: Nymph Tie-Along?

For lakes, in addition to woolly buggers, leech patterns like the Simi Seal Leech in our pattern library tied by forum member Mosca Pescador here: Simi Seal Leech and chironomid (midge) patterns like the Zebra Midge are easy ties and also staples for Western lakes. There's also the Red Chironomid in the Nymph Tie along and some existing and soon to be added additional midge patterns in the Fly Swap Pics forum.

After you've tied a few nymphs and midge and leech patterns you may want to move to some dry flies-- some of these will require dry fly hackle which can be expensive. But patterns like the Renegade and Elk Hair Caddis are fairly easy to tie and are excellent for lakes and streams 9 respectively). You'll also want to learn to tie some parachute style dry fly patterns -- and if you learn one like a Parachute Adams, you'll have learned them all -- it's usually just a matter of switching hook size and color of body dubbing and/or hackle color. Down the road after you've gotten comfortable tying the basic dries like Elk Hair Caddis and Parachutes you can add more difficult dry flies like Stimulators and/or incorporate other materials like CDC for smaller dry fly patterns and foam for stuff like hoppers etc. for other dry fly patterns.

Hope this helps a bit-- but keep asking questions!

Keep asking questions-- and browse around through the Fly Tying FAQ forum for some info on material and techniques that might be helpful and Fly Patterns forum for some step by step pics an instructions.
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