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Old 04-03-2012, 02:53 PM
silver creek silver creek is online now
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Default Re: Beginner: Different technique for slow rod?

As you know, the fly leg of the cast hitting the rod tip or hitting the rod leg of the line on the cast ("One, my line hits my rod/the other part of the loop on the forecast which to me suggests that either I am going past the 10 o'clock position ") is called a tailing loop.

To understand what causes a tailing loop and a wind or casting knot, one must know what a normal casting loop looks like. A normal loop has a leg that is following or traveling forward and a standing leg that is stationary and attached to the rod tip. Normally the two legs are separated by the width of the loop and usually in an overhead cast, the upper leg is the traveling leg and the lower leg is the stationary leg.

A tailing loop occurs because the following fly leg (upper leg) of the casting loop falls below the standing rod leg (lower leg) AND the legs are in the same casting plane. BOTH situations must occur, that is the following leg must cross the standing leg and the legs must be in the same plane. A tailing loop cannot occur if the two legs of fly line are in different casting planes.

The fly line follows the rod tip. The rod tip follows the path of the hand except for one change. As we apply power to the rod, the rod flexes, and when it flexes, the effective rod length shortens so that the rod tip comes closer to the casting hand. If we move our casting hand in a straight line, we are not compensating for the shortening of the rod tip. The rod tip will travel not in a straight path but in a concave path as it flexes and straightens during the straight line casting motion. This concave path causes a dip in the path of the following fly leg of the fly line. At the stop, the rod tip straightens and the standing rod leg line will be above the traveling fly leg line, and as the two lines cross, you get a tailing loop. So one cause is a straight line casting motion of the casting hand. The casting hand must move in a convex path to compensate for rod shortening. The bending of the rod must be done smoothly to mirror the path of the rod hand.

A second cause is a sudden application of power too early in the casting stroke - this is often called a jab. Again these sudden shock to the rod causes an acute bend and a dip in the rod tip path. The most common cause of this is when we try to cast farther than we commonly cast, and we give the rod that extra punch at the wrong time. The application of power must be smooth so that there is a progressive bend that we can compensate for. I believe this is the main of your tailing loops

Another cause is a poor backcast and poor timing. If you start the backcast too early, you may not have enough loading power to complete the forward cast so your compensate with a jab which causes a tailing loop. If you start too late, the line may have fallen too low and you will get a tailing loop from the low following line. You may also be doing this as your timing breaks down as you do multiple false casts.

There are other causes of a tailing loop but given your description, I think it is a soft action fly rod combined with poor timing on the cast and poor technique in terms of power application. All these things come to a head when you need to do multiple false casts, which in itself requires you to carry additional fly line to make a longer cast.

You are using equipment that may server your purpose and casting motion for the shorter casts, but requires more expertise to cast the distances you want to cast.

Take a video of your cast and you will find that your timing starts to break down as you try to cast longer.

I suspect your fiberglass rod has a very soft action and is prone to casting tailing loops especially when pushing it to the extreme. I will be so bold to say that it is probably an Eagle Claw fiberglass rod.
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Silver

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