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Old 06-03-2012, 05:43 AM
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Pocono Pocono is offline
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Default Casting Into Thin Air

I had an instance last Summer where I cast a fly out there and a fish took it before it hit the water (yes, I landed the fish, but it was close; I was totally unprepared for a hook set). That got me thinking more about presentation and that got me thinking more about casting and where I cast to.

What I've been doing this year is casting high; my "target" is about 1 1/2 - 3 ft. above where I want the fly to land. Right, I'm casting into thin air. But, what that allows is for the fly to "float" down to the surface of the water; about as soft a presentation as I think you can get.

I'm reasoning that the floating down is, perhaps, viewed more naturally by the trout and that this triggers a strike either while the fly is still in the air or almost immediately after it lands on the surface.

The only thing that you have to watch for is snap-back from the line, because without water attachment to the line, the fly can get pulled back easily by the tension of the cast line. It's not a big issue, but it is something that I'm paying more attention to now.

Recently this year I've chalked up quite a few fish that have taken my fly either in the air or just as it hits the surface. So, for me, there's something that's working here.

I intend to keep casting into thin air; I think it really helps with my presentation. Anyone else with the same or similar experience?

Pocono
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