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Old 07-17-2012, 12:58 PM
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Default Re: What is (Insert Fly) supposed to imitate?

Quote:
Originally Posted by jor fly View Post

Great replies everyone! The thought just hit me while tying up a couple telicos the other day. I mean, consider the telico nymph: yellow body, with peacock herl rib....... I know of no nymphs that look quite like that, yet fish in the smokies love them. And don't even get me started on a prince nymph!
You have to view things from a fish's perspective... things look different under water than they do in the vise. The Telico is a good example; where you see yellow floss and peacock herl, underwater it probably looks very much like a drown stonefly washing by. Many cased-caddis worms have a yellow body as well... the Telico could be viewed as a dislodged caddis worm in the process of rebuilding its case (stage of vulnerability).

The body (silhouette) of a Royal Coachman could be viewed as an ant profile... or the contrasting red band could be viewed as a developing egg sack (E. vitreus has a bright red/orange egg sack inside the body).

Peacock herl is magic underwater... it quickly goes from bright green to bronze once wet and has a very buggy overall appearance. The Prince Nymph probably resembles a lot of things, and matches none.

The key to a lasting, effective pattern is impressionism and emphasis of "triggers"... the more real a patten looks, the narrower its window of usage IMO. Remember, many times trout have a split second to make the decision to eat or pass. I guess the thing is, let the fish judge how things "appear" versus how they "look" to us.
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