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Old 07-29-2012, 09:08 AM
bigjim5589 bigjim5589 is offline
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Default Re: How do you hackle your buggers?

I've been tying buggers since the early 70's. I've also always tied the hackle in at the rear, by the tip first & wrapped forward. Never tried the other method. I've read posts by others who say the wire method works, so I guess you have to go with what you feel is best for you.

When I first started tying buggers, I did get some broken hackles upon use, which could have been lack of experience with the pattern. I now add copper wire or a mono rib counter wrapped over the hackle and have been doing so for many years. I'll use mono when I don't want to add extra weight. Both wire & mono have worked fine for me as I hardly ever have a problem with the palmered hackle coming loose, even if there is a break. Plus, I tie a lot of big buggers, on up to 2/0 size worm hooks for bass, which can get some extra abuse that you might not get with smaller sizes.

Again, I've read posts by others who say they do not use a rib over the hackle, tying in at the rear & wrapping forward and have no problems with broken hackles as the stem is down in the body material enough to prevent such breakage.

Any time you add a rib, whether wrapping hackle from the rear forward, or from the front to the rear, you'll add an extra tying step, so IMO, there should not be much difference time wise. Once you get used to tying a specific way, the time it takes becomes less of a factor anyway. If you add a rib, as long as you wrap it tight & secure it, either way should hold the hackle just fine. Either way, there is always the possibility of a fish getting a tooth in there & causing damage. It happens sometimes.

Therefore, whatever method you wish to use should be fine, and would just be a matter of personal preference. For me, I like the way mine turn out & have few issues with durability, so I'll keep doing what I do.
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