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Old 10-01-2012, 03:06 AM
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Default Re: walleye fly fishing.

Walleyes do love leeches but not all of the time. In mid and late summer, leeches can be the hot ticket. However, don't waste your time on one in the spring or fall. As for the "I don't think I've ever landed anything on a clouser, yet." I assume you don't use them much. Give them a chance. They may be the single most fish getting fly ever invented.

When I use two hand rods, which is most of the time, I just use a floating line. No skagit or scandi stuff. I like the more traditional lines and a top hand style cast. I get more distance. In some cases distance is a real necessity. It may help to tie flies that glow in the dark also. Here are some clousers I did with colors that work in the day, but also glow so I don't need to miss the very important right at dark hot time changing flies.
Click the image to open in full size.
Click the image to open in full size.
By the way, it may pay to use a surface fly or two in certain situations. I know it sounds weird for Walleye, but last Fall that's where we got all of them. Or at least almost all of them. This is the fly that worked the best.
Click the image to open in full size.
This fly also glows in the dark. Here is a fish I got in the dark with that very fly. It hit way out at the end of a cast in the 120'+ range. This is why I like the big two hander and the lines the way I use them.
Click the image to open in full size.
Since you are going to be in a boat at least part of time, you may want to try this tactic. Up here drifting a spinner rig with a crawler is a very popular way to catch them early in the season. If you have a guy in the boat doing that, cast forward and to the side of the boat. let the fly sink to the bottom and drift it as your pal pulls the crawler. I'd use a sinking line and adjust to distance of the cast till you get fish. Duplicate that distance as long as you stay in that depth of water. It's kind of like pulling crankbaits. More line = deeper.

Another thing you can do to shortcut your way to fish is find you a fishing buddy that does Walleye. I can help you alot, but I can't tell you a thing about your waters. If you can learn the Walleye tactics that work in your waters you can work on adapting them to flies. The right fishing buddy can put you lightyears ahead in the search.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankB2 View Post
Where are the big fish, Dan?

!!!
Hey Frank if you had hot tailed it up here right when I offered, this could have been your fish!

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