View Single Post
  #26 (permalink)  
Old 10-10-2012, 06:10 PM
wt bash's Avatar
wt bash wt bash is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Akron Ohio (don't let that fool you)
Posts: 1,988
wt bash has a brilliant futurewt bash has a brilliant futurewt bash has a brilliant futurewt bash has a brilliant futurewt bash has a brilliant futurewt bash has a brilliant futurewt bash has a brilliant futurewt bash has a brilliant futurewt bash has a brilliant futurewt bash has a brilliant futurewt bash has a brilliant future
Default Re: Still a long ways off but getting closer everyday

Here is the 4'11" 4wt, built off Bogart's Blue Ridge Banty taper, taped and ready to be glued up. Hopefully tomorrow I can glue and bind the two rods I have here at home. Until next weekend I've gone as far as I can without jumping ahead of where I am at with my teacher. I'll update when I get to final sanding and ferruling.
Click the image to open in full size.
And the tip, nastly little bugger at .054 all together, one strip is .027!
Click the image to open in full size.
There is alot of tape on there right now I know but when I'm ready to glue it gets unraveled and cut back so it doesn't overlap itself any more than one flat.

---------- Post added at 05:10 PM ---------- Previous post was at 04:52 PM ----------

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hardyreels View Post
Hi Bill,

I may help to describe what a node is and also the node dam, just say'en......... Some here will know while others may be Googling A little info on why they (nodes) and their alignment are crucial would be cool too
Good call Ard! Nodes are the rings you see in the pic of the raw culm, they are like growth marks. For lack of a better explaination the nodal dams are like floors in a skyscraper, without them in place the bamboo, while growing, would collapse in on itself. The outer node is a slight lip that must be sanded down or pressed flat. The nodal dams are on the pith side or inside of the cane and must be gouged out with either a gouge or chisel. The staggering of the nodes is one of the most important steps in making cane rods. Nodes are weak spots. As bamboo is a grass or reed with thousands of small "power fibers" running the length and the nodes are areas where they stop and turn in on themselves and start over. So when you stagger you try your best to pick an area of the culm that will give you atleast 5 inches of node free space towards the tip and the ferrule. The staggering pattern weather a 2x2, 3x3 or Garrisons spiral pattern is set up in a way so that no two nodes are ever touching across the flats of the strips. 3x3 stagger means three strips with identical nodes are lined up, the next three are lined up and then staggered atleast 5 inches apart. The first three are numbered 1 3 and 5 and the last three 2 4 6 and put together in numerical order when its time to glue up. 2x2 is much the same however when they go together in numerical order the node pattern is somewhat random looking where the 3x3 has a nice pattern to it and looks beautiful with sanded nodes all golden against the chocolatte brown flamming. I hope that made sense
__________________
Oh I live to be the ruler of life not a slave
Reply With Quote