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Old 11-13-2012, 01:15 PM
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Default Re: Indicator Fly for Winter?

Quote:
Originally Posted by brookfieldangler View Post
I'd love to find a dry fly that is super buoyant to hold double nymph rigs for steelhead.

Part of the problem I have with indicator flies is that I need my set up to get to the bottom fast which typically means heavy flies with tungsten heads and additional shot. Considering this rig puts a bigger thingamobobber at its threshold, I can't imagine a fly being buoyant enough to handle it.


When I am fishing clear and shallower water though and maybe just have a light nymph or egg pattern, A good natural looking fly would be great!
Why do you want to use a dry fly at all? If you are fishing double bead tungsten nymphs there isn't an indicator dry fly that will help you at all. Why not just an indicator?

Droppers fished under dries is a technique generally used when fish are eating big flies from the surface. In the winter time fishing hoppers, stimulators, huge foam ants, etc. i.e. flies that will support the weight of heavy nymphs just seems like more hassle than it's worth.

First, you are adding a fly that will most likely not be "fishing." Second, you are adding two knots to the equation, one for the top fly then the dropper ties to the bend. This greatly weakens your nymph rig by 200% as opposed to zero knots to your fly and a looped on indicator. Plus, considering tying unnecessary knots with cold wet hands why not eliminate this all together.

Winter nymphing is about using a nice short strong leader to your heavy anchor fly and then one connection to your trailing nymph. Keep it easy!
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