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Old 11-21-2012, 12:06 AM
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Hardyreels Hardyreels is offline
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Default Re: Looking for a new fly rod...

Hey there,

Sorry for seeing this go so long without a reply. I'm not familiar with the rod of which you speak but that seldom stops me when a post has no replies Unless you are going to be fishing some very fussy fish with tiny flies I would lean toward a 5 or 6 weight rod. Either one will make a good all round fishing rod for multiple species. I fished an Orvis 7'9" 5 weight Far & Fine from 1979 - 1995 before I started using another rod much at all. I did have a 9' 7 weight Lamiglass for Pike but I fished trout, bass, and salmon with the #5 rod. I still have the rod and use it more than any other single hand rod I own. Below is a fish that was brought to shore with a #5 and it happens every year while trout fishing.

Click the image to open in full size.

The rational behind posting the photo is not to impress with a fish caught but rather what you can do on a #5 rod and line. With either a 5 or 6 weight you can learn to cast about anything you'll ever want to tie to the leader. It just takes some thought combined with practice. I use the rod pictured with a 28" lead head spliced into the middle of my leader and tie size 4 - 6 salmon flies to a 10 - 12 pound tippet and cast using what are commonly known as 'single hand Spey' casts. I do own a couple six rated rods made of cane and glass but in graphite sticks I like the 'tweener' I've got a #5 in an old PM-10 Orvis 9 footer also and have dragged in some big fellas with that one as well. They cover the 4-5-6 range real well.

Don't be fooled into thinking you have to have a super light line weight to throw tiny flies either, you can fish all day easier using a size 20 on a 5 or 6 than you can using a size 4 on a #4 weight rod. So there's a reply, I hope it helps you with the decision.

Ard
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