View Single Post
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 12-13-2012, 01:38 PM
silver creek silver creek is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 1,995
silver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond reputesilver creek has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Why does my line fall all squiggly?

Quote:
Originally Posted by jhardin80 View Post
My casts were doing the same thing, what helped me a lot was getting on youtube and watching some casting videos. There are several on there that are good and explain what and how to do it. Then I just go out in the back yard and I practiced a lot with it. Once I did that my casts were much better than before and I think part of my problem now is the cheap rod, reel, line combo I have. Waiting for xmas to get my new stuff and see if I am correct about that.

Practice, Practice, Practice!

Good Luck and keep having fun!
I'll agree that videos are better than no video BUT they are not the total solution even with practice.

Here's the problem I see again and again. The newbie thinks he/she is doing what the the caster in the video is doing but they are not. Typically, they go way to far back, they use too much arm extension, they have poor stops, etc, etc.

The problem is they cannot see themselves cast, and so they have no point of reference from which to make the needed corrections. Is it not logical that if you are going to learn from a video, you should have a video of yourself to compare what you are doing with what the video instructor is doing?

Even when I am standing by their side, most newbies cannot duplicate what I tell them to do unless I break their casting motion down, and make stepwise corrections.

The crux of the issue is that practice does not make perfect. Perfect Practice makes perfect. The great majority of beginners trying to teach themselves, cannot practice perfectly without seeing themselves cast or having someone knowledgeable correct them.

The beauty of teaching a group of people to cast is that I can point to another beginner with the same casting fault, and show them what they are doing right or wrong. So the other caster becomes the "video" of what the caster is doing right or wrong.

Correcting a casting fault by yourself is a three step process. First you need to see what the fault is with your own eyes. Step two is to try to correct the fault. Step three is to verify that you have corrected the fault. All three require the beginner to "see" the fault and the correction.

How can the beginner do all three steps by himself? It is d*mn hard without a video of himself as a reference.

An example is the backcast. It is very difficult for a beginner to "feel" the backcast so he turns and watches his backcast to get visual cues. It is apparent that the original poster is unable to "see" or "feel" what he is doing wrong. If he could, there would be no need to ask for help. Thus, I suggest a video.
__________________
Regards,

Silver



"Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought"..........Szent-Gyorgy

Last edited by silver creek; 12-13-2012 at 04:39 PM.
Reply With Quote