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Old 01-10-2013, 02:48 PM
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Default Re: My real rod weights

It doesn't change based on completed or not. You are starting off with the tip in a fixed spot. The weight required to flex it does not change. Guides will effect the recovery and the action, but not to the degree most people think it does. And you didn't understand him right. Whatever the blank is, that's what you get when you are done. That or he didn't understand it and was talking a big game to you.

As is mentioned in the system, you need to hang the bag on the tip and then measure so that none of the weight of the bag and clip, and the guides are not counted in the end result. The spine also does not effect the ERN but it does have a lot to do with whether you can bust the rod setting a hook on a fish or not. Most rods are built on what is called 'Straightest Visual Line'. That is where every blank has a bit of curve to it. One's that don't are as rare as Bigfoot. You eye down the blank and or the pieces and orient the blank in the completed rod so that the weight of the guides pull the rod so it LOOKS straight. The spine is the only direction you can flex a blank and not have it try and twist. It is easy to see which way your rod is made. Take it by the tip in between your thumb and finger. Pick the rest of the rod up with your other hand's thumb sideways across the blank as a rest. Don't do this with the reel on it. Spin the rod slowly with the fingers holding the tip. You can feel a spot where it wants to stop. It is the spine. If the guides are anyplace but straight down on the bottom, it was built on the straightest visual line. They look good that way, but if you have ever set the hook on a fish and had your rod snap right in front of the grip by 6 or so inches, you were the victim of a SVL built rod. They do it because of the way most anglers by rods.

Go to a tackle shop any busy day and watch people look at rods. They pick it up, wiggle it and then eye down it. I got a DVD back about 10 years ago from a major rod maker. They showed the factory tour, bragged about the rods and then said they build them on straightest visual line. I was a tad shocked. It was a fly rod company by the way. Graphite has com a long way and the busting rod problem is less than it used to be, but any rod not built on the spine is at risk of busting in a hook set. It's not the bending that breaks them, it's the sudden shock/twist that busts them. You can slowly bend them past the point they would break that way and be fine. It's not the bend, it's the twist that gets them. As for the worst spot to build them off of the spine is 90 degrees.
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