View Single Post
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 01-17-2013, 12:28 PM
jaybo41's Avatar
jaybo41 jaybo41 is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: On a trout stream/Suburban Pittsburgh
Posts: 2,456
Blog Entries: 1
jaybo41 has a reputation beyond reputejaybo41 has a reputation beyond reputejaybo41 has a reputation beyond reputejaybo41 has a reputation beyond reputejaybo41 has a reputation beyond reputejaybo41 has a reputation beyond reputejaybo41 has a reputation beyond reputejaybo41 has a reputation beyond reputejaybo41 has a reputation beyond reputejaybo41 has a reputation beyond reputejaybo41 has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Why did you go two hand?

Mr. Bash and I are pretty close in location, so my thoughts pretty much echo his post. For the streams I fish, it is limiting, pretty much to one or two steelhead tribs and in the widest locations on those streams. It is a blast, I throughly enjoy doing it and for the most part it simply gives me another means to fish with. A change of pace if you will. My rod is an 6110 switch, so not a full spey rod. My go to GL steelhead rod is a 10 footer, I can nymph & egg, swing streamers and do some single hand spey/switch casting with it. Even that rod limits me as the smallest steelhead streams are best fished with a 9 footer. Unfortunately the low clear conditions we often see pretty much call for these tactics over swinging streamers or those traditional steel/salmon flies.

I'll give the advantage to the switch rod for larger streamers using two hand casts but if I need to use any of the aforementioned flies, it is cumbersome to cast. I have a pretty light reel on it too and it's not terrible by any stretch of the means, but less than ideal. The more versatile rod for my location and the streams I'm fishing is the single hand rod. If I were to add a few other locations, say in NY and or in MI or WI to the mix, the two hander would be absolutely ideal. If I were blessed to live in the PNW, or fish there on a regular basis it would be a no brainer to go with a 2 hander.

I have not really fished it in a lake/pond but I'd imagine a two hander would help get you distance and make for easier casting given the fact that there could be obstacles behind you.

Just curious, have you tried learning to cast with your other arm? Spey/switch casting will also involve a learning curve. Not trying to say it's a bad choice to go that way for you or anyone for that matter. Point being outside of the learning curve, it really is an investment in itself.
__________________
~*~Leave only your footprints~*~

Last edited by jaybo41; 01-17-2013 at 01:05 PM.
Reply With Quote