Thread: Camo fly line?
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Old 01-17-2013, 04:50 PM
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Default Re: Camo fly line?

Some years back in the era of film, I was working on an article about fly line color for one of the the big outdoor sports magazines. The art director thought it would be cool to have a photograph of floating lines from the fish's perspective. I took the editor's bag full of different colored lines to a medium sized trout stream that was running nice and clear and, in a run upstream from a bridge, rigged a stout nylon cord from one bank across to the other. I uncoiled a good amount of line from each and tied the rest of the coiled line to the cord so they ran downstream parallel to one another...must have been a dozen ranging from white to olive to bright orange. I went up on the bridge and photographed them from above with a normal 35mm Nikon SLR, that was easy and colorful too. Then I waded about with an underwater camera. Back then cameras were manual focusing and exposure setting so a good degree of experimentation (guess work) was involved so I shoot a lot and with different ASA slide film. The results I got, after considerable editing, were not too surprising. The surface shots showed all color lines are adequately to highly visible in sunlight and the sub-surface photographs showed largely equal opaque darker silhouettes against the sky except where the riffling current pushed a bit of line subsurface where its color was visible. My conclusion was that despite the fact that sticks and leaves and strands of grass are always floating about, try to keep your line from floating over fish and you are better off. When false casting, cast away from your riser to avoid a flash of light or water droplets from your line appearing in his window then redirect your presentation cast towards your targeted fish. With proper approach the color line you are using should not matter at all and I have fished bright orange instructor lines perfectly effectively though aesthetically I prefer medium value tan, olive and blue lines. Ultimately, the taper design, weight distribution and optimal complimenting the rod you are fishing trumps line color.
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